Offshore

The result for Detail First skipper Scott Broadby, sailing his Farr 1104, is a testament to the team’s hard work and grit on the race track.

Damien Seguin, multiple Paralympic champion, is sailing immaculately and is up to third, increasingly taking the race to Charlie Dalin who is now less than 70 miles ahead.

Days of light winds and mild temperatures have been summarily replaced by 30-35 knot winds. Deep reefed sails are the order of the day. It is cold, miserable and wet, with freezing South Pacific water sluicing the decks.

Alive, skippered by Duncan Hine and sailing with a mostly Tasmanian crew, finished the race with a corrected time of 1 day, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 16 seconds.

The aspiring Olympians had a superb first race in their new Jeanneau Sun Fast 3300, winning three of the four handicap divisions.

Bestaven should celebrate his 48th birthday Monday with the perfect gift, seeing his lead increase still further, as he crosses the low into fast reaching conditions.

The Reichel-Pugh 66 was a late entry after the Sydney Hobart was cancelled.

Despite a mid-afternoon lull between two fronts, the Cookson 50 is expected in Devonport tomorrow morning.

Holiday-makers on the Peninsular could be treated to a spectacular sight, with all boats likely to be carrying colourful spinnakers across the start line.

Charlie Dalin (APIVIA) goes on the record as the Christmas Number 1 on the Vendée Globe rankings after being granted a narrow lead, while nearest rival Yannick Bestaven climbs north on Maître CoQ IV in search of a fast sleigh ride east.

Leader Yannick Bestaven is threatening to escape from the dominant high pressure and second-placed Charlie Dalin and third-placed Thomas Ruyant, close to the centre of the high pressure, are powerless to stop him.

Cock of the Bay has attracted more than 100 entries while the Melbourne Devonport Race is now Australia’s only interstate yacht race to be held over the Christmas period.

If Bestaven can wriggle clear of a frustrating anticyclone and his pursuers remain snared, then the leader could hit the jackpot, gaining an advance of many hundreds of miles.

The front-running group must try to negotiate a large, tricky high pressure system which is blocking their route east.

It is there that the Vendee Globe racers see their longitude start to drop from 180 and emotionally each degree feels closer to home and to the Les Sables d’Olonne finish line at 1.799 W.

With anyone from the greater Sydney area required to quarantine for 14 days when entering Tasmania, the race became unworkable.